Michael S. Prince

Communication Studies Faculty

Olympic College

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Communication Studies courses at Olympic College focus on the basic skills and critical thought needed for students to transfer to four-year programs. Courses also expose students to cutting-edge theory and technology in preparation for careers in the growing field of communication.

Communication Studies courses I teach at Olympic College:

CMST 125/New Writing and Reporting students explore the fundamentals of news writing, news value, media law/ethics and Associated Press style.

CMST 105/Photojournalism students explore the basics of digital photojournalism with special attention to news value and composition.

CMST& 102/Introduction to Mass Media students explore the ever-changing world of mass media and its impact on American Society.

CMST 293/Mass Media Law and Ethics students explore the fundamentals of legal and ethical issues in mass media, including study of landmark cases and theory.

CMST& 220/Public Speaking students learn the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering effective public speeches to inform, analyze and persuade.

For more information about communication studies at Olympic College, please contact me at mprince@olympic.edu, 360.475.7243, 1600 Chester Ave., Bremerton, Washington 98337-1699, http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/.

Summer 2015 syllabi:

CMST 105/Photojournalism/ONLINE

"So in photography, the first fresh emotion, the feeling for the thing, is captured complete and for all time at the very moment it is seen and felt. Feeling and recording are simultaneous." -Edward Weston, American photographer

Instructor: Michael S. Prince

Phone: 360-475-7243

Email: mprince@olympic.edu

Website: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/

Office: MUSIC 102

Office Hours: If you have questions, etc., please contact me via your Olympic College email (not Canvas mail).

Class Place/Time: ONLINE, https://olympic.instructure.com/login

Your Email/Required: When communicating with me via email, use your Olympic College email address (not Canvas email), no exceptions. http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail

Description: CMST 105 stresses recognition, development and creation of photojournalistic images. The course provides experience in shooting digital photographs.

Objectives: This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and theories of photojournalism. CMST 105 is also designed to increase understanding of photography as a communication tool and to train students to translate ideas and newsworthy information into photographic form. Special emphasis will be given to newsworthiness and composition.

Required Text: Photojournalism: The Professionals’ Approach by Kobre.

Required Assignments: Students complete five photo assignments during the quarter. Each assignment requires five photos (each with a cutline) submitted via Olympic College e-mail (please send one email with a direct link to your photos/cutlines and your essay with each assignment). Students must include a cutline/caption with each photo submitted. Students also submit five written essays based on assigned textbook chapters and material provided by the instructor. All essay assignments require a short overview (600 words minimum) showing knowledge of the subject and conveying opinion about photos, technique, etc.

Managing Photos: You will need to create a Picasa account (or something similar) to manage your photos.

My Picasa account: https://picasaweb.google.com/michaelsprince

Please give this link a look before you start shooting: http://photoinf.com/Golden_Mean/

Note: All photos you submit should include at least one person in the image. All photos submitted must be shot during the quarter. Photojournalists, like all journalists, must make deadlines/due dates (it’s part of the gig). Late assignments are deducted one-letter grade for each day late. Assignments will not be accepted beyond four days from the due date.

Grading Methods: Grading of photojournalism skill is unavoidably subjective. There may be times when you disagree with an evaluation; please feel free to say so, that we may explore each other’s thinking. But to assist in a clear definition, let us identify what each letter grade means:

A – Superior, outstanding, equal to what should be expected of a new photojournalist on the job.

B – Very good, better-than-average images; evidence of more than average effort in capturing the story in pictures.

C – Acceptable, satisfactory, average; evidence that photos are valid and correctly presented; that with some editing, the photos are at least “publishable.”

D – Less-than-average images, weak.

F – Unsatisfactory, unusable, very weak.

Final Grade Formula: Five photo assignments 50 points (10 points each); five written essay assignments 50 points (10 points each). Grand total 100 points.

Submitting Assignments: Submit all assignments via Olympic College email to me at mprince@olympic.edu. In subject area of email include CMST 105 and assignment submitted. Example: CMST 105/Assignment #1. Attach (and include in the body of your email) your essay and cut/paste a direct link to your assignment photos/cutlines in the body of your email. Be sure to include your name with each assignment.

Photo Assignments:

#1, feature, five photos of people you do not know doing things/engaged in everyday life, like a day at the park or cruising to Seattle on a ferry, due on or before July 13.

#2, sports, five photos of people you do not know engaged in a sporting event, like a soccer match, a round of golf, kayaking, hiking, throwing a Frisbee, playing horseshoes, etc., due on or before July 20.

#3, news, five photos of people you do not know engaged in a newsworthy event, a war protest in Seattle or a music festival or a Bremerton City Council meeting, etc., due on or before August 3.

#4, environmental portrait, five photos of a person in his/her environment, work, home, whatever it may be, pay close attention to the face and facial expressions, shoot candid (or creatively posed) images, make sure your five photos are distinctively different, due on or before August 10.

#5, final photo story, five photos of people you do not know showing a newsworthy story (one subject/topic), make sure each of your five photos shows a different part of the story, due on or before August 24.

Written Essay Assignments (600-word minimum each):

-#1, chapters (assignment) and (feature), due on or before July 13.

-#2, chapters (sports) and (law), due on or before July 20.

-#3, chapters (spot news), (general news) and The Bok Model (located in the Files tab on Canvas), due on or before August 3.

-#4, chapters (portraits) and (ethics), due on or before August 10.

-#5, chapters (covering the issues), (photo story) and (history), due on or before August 24.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism—the willful presentation of someone else’s work as your own—is just as proscribed in photojournalism as it is in other academic classes. If you present any portion of text written or images photographed by another as your own work, I will be forced to give you a zero for the assignment. Further instances of plagiarism may require more serious measures, up to and including a failing grade for the class and referral to the Vice President of Student Affairs for disciplinary measures. Please feel free to chat with me if you’re ever confused about the differences between plagiarism and ethical use of sources.

Campus Alerts: I encourage you to subscribe to the Olympic College alert system for updates to your cell phone and e-mail address regarding school closures, etc. http://www.olympic.edu/alerts/signup.htm

Special Needs: If you require any special assistance or technology in order to fully benefit from the course, please contact Access Services (Humanities 114, Ext. 7540, http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentServices/AccessServices/) to get a review of your needs and to make any necessary arrangements. Please e-mail me or speak with me during the first week of class in order to let me know how I may help. All information will be kept private. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legal provisions, you have the legal right to accessible educational materials and classroom environments.

 

CMST& 102/Intro to Mass Media/ONLINE

"The speed of communications is wondrous to behold. It is also true that speed can multiply the distribution of information that we know to be untrue." -Edward R. Murrow, American journalist

Instructor: Michael S. Prince

Phone: 360-475-7243

Email: mprince@olympic.edu

Website: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/

Office: MUSIC102

Office Hours: If you have questions, please contact me via your Olympic College email (not Canvas email).

Class Time/Place: ONLINE, https://olympic.instructure.com/login

Your Email/Required: When communicating with me via email, use your Olympic College email address (not Canvas email), no exceptions. http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail

Description: CMST& 102 explores the ever-changing world of mass media and its impact on American society.

Objectives: This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and theories of mass media. CMST& 102 is also designed to increase understanding of mass media as a major force in our daily lives. In addition, Intro to Mass Media challenges students to become more careful, critical consumers of the information received through mass media.

Prerequisite: None.

Required Texts: The Dynamics of Mass Communications: Media in Transition by Joseph R. Dominick.

Final Grade Formula: Two essay assignments (minimum 2,000 words each) from assigned chapters and material provided by the instructor 60 points (30 points each); final essay (minimum 2,000 words, seven sources) exploring a mass-media subject of your choice 40 points. Grand total of 100 points.

Assignments:

Assignment #1/essay (2,000 words minimum), due on or before July 20 (assigned chapters from the Dominick textbook, The Bok Model and the First Amendment, please see details below).

-Dominick textbook chapters (perspectives on mass communication), (historical and cultural context), (formal controls: laws, rules, regulations), (ethics and other informal controls) and (social effects of mass communication). Summarize/review the chapters. Concentrate more/write more on chapters that are of more interest to you, but be sure to touch on all assigned chapters. Feel free to share your opinion about the content.

-The Bok Model (implement the ethical-decision-making model with the two controversial images provided, located in the Files tab on Canvas).

-First Amendment (What are the five rights? Briefly explain.). http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/

Assignment #2/essay (2,000 words minimum), due on or before August 10 (assigned chapters from the Dominick textbook, Watergate and Edward R. Murrow, please see details below).

-Dominick textbook chapters (newspapers), (motion pictures), (broadcast television), (the Internet and the World Wide Web) and (advertising). Summarize/review the chapters. Concentrate more/write more on chapters that are of more interest to you, but be sure to touch on all assigned chapters. Feel free to share your opinion about the content.

-Watergate (media coverage/impact). http://www.washingtonpost.com/watergate/

-Edward R. Murrow (his role as a mass communicator). http://www.museum.tv/eotv/murrowedwar.htm

Assignment #3/essay (minimum 2,000 words, seven sources), due on or before August 24 (please see details below).

-Pick a mass-media topic of special interest to you. Your final essay should allow you an opportunity to explore your mass-media topic thoroughly. Be sure to narrow your topic. For example, “television” would be WAY too broad, but a close study of “Super Bowl viewership”, “Walter Cronkite” or the “FCC” would work well. Use MLA (or another formal academic style) to cite sources. Include bibliography/sources cited page. The Dominick textbook may be used as one of your seven sources.

Note:

-Three excellent mass-media sources you might find helpful in your final-essay research: http://www.poynter.org/, http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/columns/media_equation/index.html, http://reliablesources.blogs.cnn.com/

-Wikipedia and other encyclopedias (and dictionaries) are not considered credible sources to cite in an academic essay.

-Late assignments are deducted one-letter grade for each day late. Assignments will not be accepted beyond four days from the due date.

Submitting Assignments: Submit all assignments via Olympic College email to me at mprince@olympic.edu. In subject area of your e-mail include CMST& 102 and assignment submitted. Example: CMST& 102/ONLINE/Assignment #1. Attach your assignment and cut/paste in the body of your email. Be sure to include your name with each assignment.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism—the willful presentation of someone else’s work as your own—is just as proscribed in intro to mass media as it is in other academic classes. If you present any portion of text written (or other communication) by another as your own work, I will be forced to give you a zero for the assignment. Further instances of plagiarism may require more serious measures, up to and including a failing grade for the class and referral to the Vice President of Student Affairs for disciplinary measures. Please feel free to chat with me if you’re ever confused about the differences between plagiarism and ethical use of sources.

Campus Alerts: I encourage you to subscribe to the Olympic College alert system for updates to your cell phone and e-mail address regarding school closures, etc. http://www.olympic.edu/alerts/signup.htm

Special Needs: If you require any special assistance or technology in order to fully benefit from the course, please contact Access Services (Humanities 114, Ext. 7540, http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentServices/AccessServices/) to get a review of your needs and to make any necessary arrangements. Please e-mail me or speak with me during the first week of class in order to let me know how I may help. All information will be kept private. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legal provisions, you have the legal right to accessible educational materials and classroom environments.