105:

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/?_r=0

http://www.pulitzer.org/bycat/Breaking-News-Photography

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/dorothea-lange/watch-full-film-dorothea-lange-grab-a-hunk-of-lightning/3260/

 

102:

Edward R. Murrow RTDNA speech

This Reporter/Edward R. Murrow PBS documentary

Dick Cavett's Watergate/PBS documentary

The Persuaders/PBS advertising documentary

Digital Nation/PBS documentary

Edward Snowden/John Oliver

 

220:

http://www.speaking.pitt.edu/student/public-speaking/basics.html

http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/ethos-pathos-logos/

http://www.write-out-loud.com/writing-a-persuasive-speech.html

Persuasive Speech Tips

 

Michael S. Prince

Communication Studies Faculty

Olympic College

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/ferry%5b1%5d.WEB.jpg

Communication Studies courses at Olympic College focus on the basic skills and critical thought needed for students to transfer to four-year programs. Courses also expose students to cutting-edge theory and technology in preparation for careers in the growing field of communication.

Communication Studies courses I teach at Olympic College:

CMST 125/New Writing and Reporting students explore the fundamentals of news writing, news value, media law/ethics and Associated Press style.

CMST 105/Photojournalism students explore the basics of digital photojournalism with special attention to news value and composition.

CMST& 102/Introduction to Mass Media students explore the ever-changing world of mass media and its impact on American Society.

CMST 293/Mass Media Law and Ethics students explore the fundamentals of legal and ethical issues in mass media, including study of landmark cases and theory.

CMST& 220/Public Speaking students learn the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering effective public speeches to inform, analyze and persuade.

For more information about communication studies at Olympic College, please contact me at mprince@olympic.edu, 360.475.7243, 1600 Chester Ave., Bremerton, Washington 98337-1699, http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/.

Spring 2015 syllabi:

CMST 105/Photojournalism/Bremerton campus

"So in photography, the first fresh emotion, the feeling for the thing, is captured complete and for all time at the very moment it is seen and felt. Feeling and recording are simultaneous." -Edward Weston, American photographer

Instructor: Michael S. Prince

Email: mprince@olympic.edu

Phone: 360-475-7243

Website: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/

Office: MUSIC 102

Office Hours: If you have questions, etc., please contact me via your Olympic College email (not Canvas mail). Or visit me on the Bremerton campus Monday and Wednesday 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.; and by appointment.

Class Place/Time: BUS 206, 10-11:24 a.m., Monday and Wednesday.

Your Email/Required: When communicating with me via email, use your Olympic College email address (not Canvas email), no exceptions. http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail

Description: CMST 105 stresses recognition, development and creation of photojournalistic images. The course provides experience in shooting digital photographs.

Objectives: This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and theories of photojournalism. CMST 105 is also designed to increase understanding of photography as a communication tool and to train students to translate ideas and newsworthy information into photographic form. Special emphasis will be given to newsworthiness and composition.

Required Text: Photojournalism: The Professionals’ Approach by Kobre.

Required Assignments: Students complete six photo assignments during the quarter. Each assignment requires photos submitted via Olympic College e-mail (please send one email with a direct link to your photos/cutlines and your essay with each assignment). Students must include a cutline/caption with each photo submitted (excluding Assignment #1/mugshots). Students submit six written essays based on assigned textbook chapters and material provided by the instructor. All essay assignments require a short overview (500 words minimum) showing knowledge of the subject and conveying opinion about photos, technique, etc.

Managing Photos: You will need to create a Picasa account (or something similar) to manage your photos.

My Picasa account: https://picasaweb.google.com/michaelsprince

Please give this link a look before you start shooting: http://photoinf.com/Golden_Mean/

Note: All photos you submit should include at least one person in the image. All photos submitted must be shot during the quarter. Photojournalists, like all journalists, must make deadlines/due dates (it’s part of the gig). Late assignments are deducted one-letter grade for each day late. Assignments will not be accepted beyond four days from the due date.

Grading Methods: Grading of photojournalism skill is unavoidably subjective. There may be times when you disagree with an evaluation; please feel free to say so, that we may explore each other’s thinking. But to assist in a clear definition, let us identify what each letter grade means:

A – Superior, outstanding, equal to what should be expected of a new photojournalist on the job in a daily or weekly newspaper.

B – Very good, better-than-average images; evidence of more than average effort in capturing the story in pictures.

C – Acceptable, satisfactory, average; evidence that photos are valid and correctly presented; that with some editing, the photos are at least “publishable.”

D – Less-than-average images, weak.

F – Unsatisfactory, unusable, very weak.

Final Grade Formula: First five photo assignments 50 points (10 points each); final photo story 20 points; six written essay assignments 30 points (5 points each). Grand total 100 points.

Submitting Assignments: Submit all assignments via Olympic College email to me at mprince@olympic.edu. In subject area of email include CMST 105 and assignment submitted. Example: CMST 105/Assignment #1. Attach (and include in the body of your email) your essay and cut/paste a direct link to your assignment photos/cutlines in the body of your email. Be sure to include your name with each assignment.

Photo Assignments:

#1, mugs, 10 photos (head/shoulders shots) of people you do not know, due on or before April 13.

#2, feature, four photos of people you do not know doing things/engaged in everyday life, like a day at the park or cruising to Seattle on a ferry, due on or before April 20.

#3, sports, four photos of people you do not know engaged in a sporting event, like a soccer match, a round of golf, kayaking, hiking, throwing a Frisbee, playing horseshoes, etc., due on or before May 4.

#4, news, four photos of people you do not know engaged in a newsworthy event, a war protest in Seattle or a music festival or a Bremerton City Council meeting, etc., due on or before May 18.

#5, environmental portrait, four photos of a person in his/her environment, work, home, whatever it may be, pay close attention to the face and facial expressions, shoot candid (or creatively posed) images, due on or before June 1.

#6, final photo story, four photos of people you do not know showing a newsworthy story (one subject/topic), due on or before June 15.

Written Essay Assignments (500-word minimum each):

-#1, chapters 1 (assignment) and 4 (feature), due on or before April 13.

-#2, chapters 6 (sports) and 16 (law), due on or before April 20.

-#3, chapters 2 (spot news) and 3 (general news), due on or before May 4.

-#4, chapters 5 (portraits) and 15 (ethics), due on or before May 18.

-#5, chapters 10 (covering the issues) and 11 (photo story), due on or before June 1.

-#6, chapter 17 (history) and The Bok Model (located in the Files tab on Canvas), due on or before June 15.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism—the willful presentation of someone else’s work as your own—is just as proscribed in photojournalism as it is in other academic classes. If you present any portion of text written or images photographed by another as your own work, I will be forced to give you a zero for the assignment. Further instances of plagiarism may require more serious measures, up to and including a failing grade for the class and referral to the Vice President of Student Affairs for disciplinary measures. Please feel free to chat with me if you’re ever confused about the differences between plagiarism and ethical use of sources.

Campus Alerts: I encourage you to subscribe to the Olympic College alert system for updates to your cell phone and e-mail address regarding school closures, etc. http://www.olympic.edu/alerts/signup.htm

Special Needs: If you require any special assistance or technology in order to fully benefit from the course, please contact Access Services (Humanities 114, Ext. 7540, http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentServices/AccessServices/) to get a review of your needs and to make any necessary arrangements. Please e-mail me or speak with me during the first week of class in order to let me know how I may help. All information will be kept private. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legal provisions, you have the legal right to accessible educational materials and classroom environments.

 

CMST& 102/Intro to Mass Media/Bremerton campus

"The speed of communications is wondrous to behold. It is also true that speed can multiply the distribution of information that we know to be untrue." -Edward R. Murrow, American journalist

Instructor: Michael S. Prince

Email: mprince@olympic.edu

Phone: 360-475-7243

Website: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/

Office: MUSIC 102

Office Hours: If you have questions, please contact me via Olympic College email, phone or stop by for a face-to-face visit Monday and Wednesday 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.; and by appointment.

Class Time/Place: TTh 10 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Bremerton campus, BUS 105.

Your Email/Required: When communicating with me via email, use your Olympic College email address, no exceptions. http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail

Description: CMST& 102 explores the ever-changing world of mass media and its impact on American society.

Objectives: This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and theories of mass media. CMST& 102 is also designed to increase understanding of mass media as a major force in our daily lives. In addition, Intro to Mass Media challenges students to become more careful, critical consumers of the information received through mass media.

Prerequisite: None.

Required Texts: The Dynamics of Mass Communications: Media in Transition by Joseph R. Dominick.

Final Grade Formula: Two essay assignments (minimum 2,000 words each) from assigned chapters and material provided by the instructor 50 points (25 points each); final essay (minimum 2,000 words, seven sources) exploring a mass-media subject of your choice 30 points; two workshops10 points (5 points each); and attendance, 10 points. For a grand total of 100 points.

Assignments:

Essay Assignment #1 (2,000 words minimum), due on or before April 27 (assigned chapters from the Dominick textbook, The Bok Model and the First Amendment, please see details below).

-Dominick textbook chapters (perspectives on mass communication), (historical and cultural context), (formal controls: laws, rules, regulations), (ethics and other informal controls) and (social effects of mass communication). Summarize/review the chapters. Concentrate more/write more on chapters that are of more interest to you, but be sure to touch on all assigned chapters. Feel free to share your opinion about the content.

-The Bok Model (implement the ethical-decision-making model with something controversial in mass media).

-First Amendment (What are the five rights? Briefly explain.). http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/

Essay Assignment #2 (2,000 words minimum), due on or before May 18 (assigned chapters from the Dominick textbook, Watergate and Edward R. Murrow, please see details below).

-Dominick textbook chapters (newspapers), (motion pictures), (broadcast television), (the Internet and the World Wide Web) and (advertising). Summarize/review the chapters. Concentrate more/write more on chapters that are of more interest to you, but be sure to touch on all assigned chapters. Feel free to share your opinion about the content.

-Watergate (media coverage/impact). http://www.washingtonpost.com/watergate/

-Edward R. Murrow (his role as a mass communicator). http://www.museum.tv/eotv/murrowedwar.htm

Final Essay (minimum 2,000 words, seven sources), due on or before June 15 (please see details below).

-Pick a mass-media topic of special interest to you. Your final essay should allow you an opportunity to explore your topic thoroughly. Be sure to narrow your topic. For example, “television” would be WAY too broad, but a close study of “Super Bowl viewership”, “Walter Cronkite” or the “FCC” would work well. Use MLA (or another formal academic style) to cite sources. Include bibliography/sources cited page. The Dominick textbook may be used as one of your seven sources.

Note:

-Three excellent mass-media sources you might find helpful in your final-essay research: http://www.poynter.org/, http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/columns/media_equation/index.html, http://reliablesources.blogs.cnn.com/

-Wikipedia and other encyclopedias (and dictionaries) are not considered credible sources to cite in an academic essay.

-Late assignments are deducted one-letter grade for each day late. Assignments will not be accepted beyond four days from the due date.

Submitting Assignments: Submit all assignments via Olympic College email to me at mprince@olympic.edu. In subject area of your e-mail include CMST& 102 and assignment submitted. Example: CMST& 102/Assignment #1. Attach your assignment and cut/paste in the body of your email. Be sure to include your name with each assignment.

Workshops: In class group work exploring specific mass-topics (details/dates to come).

Plagiarism: Plagiarism—the willful presentation of someone else’s work as your own—is just as proscribed in intro to mass media as it is in other academic classes. If you present any portion of text written (or other communication) by another as your own work, I will be forced to give you a zero for the assignment. Further instances of plagiarism may require more serious measures, up to and including a failing grade for the class and referral to the Vice President of Student Affairs for disciplinary measures. Please feel free to chat with me if you’re ever confused about the differences between plagiarism and ethical use of sources.

Campus Alerts: I encourage you to subscribe to the Olympic College alert system for updates to your cell phone and e-mail address regarding school closures, etc. http://www.olympic.edu/alerts/signup.htm

Special Needs: If you require any special assistance or technology in order to fully benefit from the course, please contact Access Services (Humanities 114, Ext. 7540, http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentServices/AccessServices/) to get a review of your needs and to make any necessary arrangements. Please e-mail me or speak with me during the first week of class in order to let me know how I may help. All information will be kept private. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legal provisions, you have the legal right to accessible educational materials and classroom environments.

CMST& 220/Public Speaking/Bremerton and Poulsbo campuses

 “If you want me to give you a two-hour presentation, I am ready today. If you want only a five-minute speech, it will take me two weeks to prepare.” –Mark Twain

Instructor: Michael S. Prince

Email: mprince@olympic.edu

Phone: 360-475-7243

Website: http://faculty.olympic.edu/mprince/

Office: MUSIC 102

Office Hours: If you have questions, please contact me via Olympic College email, phone or stop by for a face-to-face visit Monday/Wednesday 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. and 3:30-4:45 p.m.; and by appointment.

Class Time/Place: MW 1-3:15 p.m., Bremerton campus, HSS 211 and MW 5-7:15 p.m., Poulsbo campus, OCP 220.

Your Email/Required: When communicating with me via email, use your Olympic College email address, no exceptions. http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail

Description: CMST& 220 explores theory and practice of public speaking. We will work to be critical consumers of the world around us. We will also strive to make giving a speech less stressful.

Outcomes:

By the successful completion of this class, you will be able to accomplish the following:

1.Write and present well-organized speeches in a clear, confident manner with awareness of context and audience, using aspects of the canons of rhetoric and audience appeals.

2.Critically analyze speech acts using rhetorical analysis and an understanding of aspects of the canons of rhetoric, sophistry, and audience appeals as they are commonly illustrated in public speech acts.

3.Articulate the process of argument construction and illustrate an understanding of the forensic processes required to support an argument or thesis.

4.Recognize patterns from the history of public speech and rhetoric, especially those still present today.

5.Understand the basic aspects of public speaking and rhetoric as a contemporary field of study, with emphasis on sophistry, artistic appeals, idolatry, fallacies, forensics, the medium as the message, and new media contexts for public speech.

6.Demonstrate ability to analyze public speech as a tool for both reform and social control.

7.Describe how public speech can be used to address problems in social and cultural contexts both locally and globally.

Prerequisite: None.

Optional Text: Lucas, Stephen E.  The Art of Public Speaking.

Final Grade Formula: Four speeches (60 points), workshops (15 points), speech analysis (15 points) and attendance (10 points) for a total of 100 points.

Assignments/Important Dates:

Speech #1/Intro (3-5 minutes), due April 13

Speech Analysis #1, due April 15

Workshop #1, April 29

Speech #2/Info (5-7 minutes), due May 4

Speech Analysis #2, due May 13

Workshop #2, May 18

Speech #3/Persuasive (5-7 minutes), due May 20

NO CLASS, May 25 (Memorial Day)

Workshop #3, due June 3

Speech #4/Final (5-7 minutes), due June 8

The Introductory Speech:

Due: April 13

Notes: Submit notes/outline after completion of the speech

Visuals: Required (see “topic,” below)

Length: 3-5 minutes

Score: 15 possible points

Graded on: Length and preparation (see below)

Your first speech will be an introductory speech, graded mostly on completion and satisfactory length. This speech is meant to get the ball rolling. You will not be graded on any of the more complex concepts we will cover later on. Visuals or supporting materials are optional. Outlines/notes must be turned in after the speech.

Topic: You will present a photograph to the class that lets us understand something about you. The photo does not have to be of you.  You may choose to show the photo during the speech (on the overhead, or pulled up on the computer) or to simply describe it.

Some may choose biographical/personal photos, others may choose photos that help to show interests or passions. Others may choose a different tack, picking a photo that represents some aspect of them metaphorically (the new NASA rocket, for example, to show their willingness to strike out into uncharted territory). Options are open. Ask me if you have questions.

Content: You will have three minutes to discuss the photo and elaborate on why you chose it. You should use notes, usually either index cards or paper, but your speech should be extemporaneous (in other words, not a verbatim script).  Remember: your audience wants to be interested in what you have to say. Why not give them what they want? Let your speech be intriguing and memorable. Say something that will stick with us. 

Notes: After your speech is complete, you will turn in the notes you used for me to review. We will talk about preparing effective notes before the speech is due.

The Informative Speech:

Due:  May 4 (workshop on April 29)

Notes: Submit notes/outline after completion of the speech

Visuals: Optional

Length: 5-7 minutes

Score: 15 possible points

The Basics: The main goal of the informational speech is to engage listeners in the appreciation of a delicious morsel of world-knowledge. You will be graded on a rubric based in the Five Canons of Rhetoric: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery. Outlines/notes must be turned in after the speech. Visuals or supporting materials are optional.

Topic: The topic is completely open, with this one stipulation:  it should be fascinating! Think of the diverse, intriguing presentations on Ted.com; widely varying in subject, but almost all of them alike in their ability to make learning itself pleasurable.

Generally, there are two approaches for the Informative Speech:

•Present a topic in which you already have some degree of authority

•Research a topic you would like to know more about, and present your findings

Content: Your Informative Speech must meet the following requirements:

•All speeches require a focused central point that the rest of the speech supports. The speech should not be a litany of interesting but unrelated bits of information. Think about purpose and argument here: why are you telling us about your topic, and what do you hope for us to gain from your topic?

•All speeches must cite at least two credible sources cited in both the speech and (via APA or MLA) in your speech notes. These should be primary (direct) or secondary (reported), not reference sources—e.g., encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, Wikipedia.

•You should use notes, usually either index cards or paper, but your speech should be extemporaneous (in other words, not a verbatim script). You may use visuals (PowerPoint, overheads, props, etc.) if you wish, but they are not required. Consider what best serves your topic and your speaking style.

Notes: After your speech is complete, you will submit your notes to me for grading.  Notes are not graded on grammar, punctuation or presentation, though I may provide some comments/suggestions. They are mainly used to help me check your sources. Be sure that your notes include citations for your sources. Citations may be given in either APA or MLA format.

The Persuasive Speech:

Due: May 20 (workshop on May 18)

Notes: Submit notes/outline after completion of the speech

Visuals: Required

Length: 5-7 minutes

Score: 15 possible points

The Basics:

In your persuasive speech, you will attempt to present and support an argument. Here too, you will be graded with the Five Canons rubric. Outlines/notes must be turned in after the speech, evaluation of which will be factored into the invention section of the rubric. This speech also requires some sort of visual or supporting material.

Topic: The topic is completely open, with this one stipulation: it must present and support a central argument. There are many approaches for a paper’s argument: it may be useful to start with the three branches of rhetoric identified by Aristotle:

•Forensic arguments that argue how we should understand a past event

•Political/Deliberative arguments, suggesting a course of action for the future

•Ceremonial arguments, speaking of our current condition—frequently applying praise or blame

Within these three branches, there are countless offshoots. In general, however, almost all speeches focus on one of these three.

Content: Your Persuasive Speech must meet the following requirements:

•All speeches require a focused central argument that the rest of the speech supports.  It should include evidence that helps to support your point, cited in such a way as to increase your own authority.

•All speeches must cite at least two credible sources cited in both the speech and (via APA or MLA) in your speech notes. These should be primary (direct) or secondary (reported), not reference—e.g., encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, Wikipedia.

•You should use notes, usually either index cards or paper, but your speech should be extemporaneous (in other words, not a verbatim script).  You must use some form of visual (PowerPoint slides, overheads, handouts, props, et cetera) to support your presentation.

Notes: After your speech is complete, you will submit your notes to me for grading.  Notes are not graded on grammar, punctuation or presentation, though I may provide some comments/suggestions. They are mainly used to help me check your sources. Be sure that your notes include citations for your sources. Citations may be given in either APA or MLA format.

The Final Speech:

Can be informative or persuasive

Due: June 8 (workshop June 3)

Notes: Submit notes/outline after completion of the speech

Visuals: optional

Length: 5-7 minutes

Score: 15 possible points

More details about your Final Speech to come.

Grading: The speeches are graded on the Five Canons Rubric. Here are the five categories of the five canons rubric:

•Invention:  Sources, research, and evidence. Visuals, if provided.

•Arrangement:  Organization, length, clarity of information, focus of information.

•Style:  Rhetorical technique (e.g., usage of appeals), audience awareness.

•Memory:  Quality of extemporaneous speaking together with support from notes.

•Delivery:  Confidence, directness, smoothness of speech.

Workshops: You will also engage in three speech workshop days, working together in small groups. Workshops will take place for every speech except for the first. This will be your chance to work through the presentation of your speech with a small and supportive audience. Workshops are graded on participation: if you are present, and if you are giving thorough feedback, you will receive full credit.

Speech Analysis: You will analyze (in about 500 words for each speech) three speeches during the quarter from television, the Web or in person (as the occasion allows). We’ll discuss good sources for speeches in class, but one of the best is Ted.com. 

Finally, class participation and attendance will also factor into your grade.  Attending class is essential to success here, as many days will feature activities and discussions that deepen your understanding of core course concepts.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism—the willful presentation of someone else’s work as your own—is just as proscribed in public speech as it is in other academic classes. If you present any portion of text written or performed by another as your own work, I will be forced to give you a zero for the assignment. Further instances of plagiarism may require more serious measures, up to and including a failing grade for the class and referral to the Vice President of Student Affairs for disciplinary measures. Please feel free to chat with me if you’re ever confused about the differences between plagiarism and ethical use of sources.

Special Needs: If you require any special assistance or technology in order to fully benefit from the course, please contact Access Services (Humanities 114, Ext. 7540,http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentServices/AccessServices/ ) to get a review of your needs and to make any necessary arrangements. Please e-mail me or speak with me during the first week of class in order to let me know how I may help. All information will be kept private. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legal provisions, you have the legal right to accessible educational materials and classroom environments.

Campus Alerts: I encourage you to subscribe to the Olympic College alert system for updates to your cell phone and e-mail address regarding school closures, etc. http://www.olympic.edu/alerts/signup.htm